Trail of gold.

Trail of gold.

I really like these clouds.

I really like these clouds.

Good night, New Jersey.

Good night, New Jersey.

Evening walk.

Evening walk.

overlypolitebisexual:

be your OWN problematic fave

:-) I think I already am. I have all the receipts, too.

(via shabaash)

Frankly, I find it harder and harder to connect with people who aren’t struggling in some way.

Same goes for “healthy,” “fit” people who make similar comparisons and value judgements.

People with money who think the only difference between them and people without money is hard work/drive/ambition will be the death of us all.

"I think one thing you can do to help your friends who are depressed is to reach out to them not in the spirit of helping, but in the spirit of liking them and wanting their company. “I’m here to help if you ever need me” is good to know, but hard to act on, especially when you’re in a dark place. Specific, ongoing, pleasure-based invitations are much easier to absorb. “I’m here. Let’s go to the movies. Or stay in and order takeout and watch some dumb TV.” “I’m having a party, it would be really great if you could come for a little while.” Ask them for help with things you know they are good at and like doing, so there is reciprocity and a way for them to contribute. “Will you come over Sunday and help me clear my closet of unfashionable and unflattering items? I trust your eye.” “Will you read this story I wrote and help me fix the dialogue?” “Want to make dinner together? You chop, I’ll assemble.” “I am going glasses shopping and I need another set of eyes.” Remind yourself why you like this person, and in the process, remind them that they are likable and worth your time and interest.

Talk to the parts of the person that aren’t being eaten by the depression. Make it as easy as possible to make and keep plans, if you have the emotional resources to be the initiator and to meet your friends a little more than halfway. If the person turns down a bunch of invitations in a row because (presumably) they don’t have the energy to be social, respect their autonomy by giving it a month or two and then try again. Keep the invitations simple; “Any chance we could have breakfast Saturday?” > “ARE YOU AVOIDING ME BECAUSE YOU’RE DEPRESSED OR BECAUSE YOU HATE ME I AM ONLY TRYING TO HELP YOU.” “I miss you and I want to see you” > “I’m worried about you.” A depressed person is going to have a shame spiral about how their shame is making them avoid you and how that’s giving them more shame, which is making them avoid you no matter what you do. No need for you to call attention to it. Just keep asking. “I want to see you” “Let’s do this thing.” “If you are feeling low, I understand, and I don’t want to impose on you, but I miss your face. Please come have coffee with me.” “Apology accepted. ApologIES accepted. So. Gelato and Outlander?”"

#613: How do I reach out to my friends who have depression? | Captain Awkward

P.S. A lot of people with depression and other mental illnesses have trouble making decisions or choosing from a bunch of different options. “Wanna get dinner at that pizza place on Tuesday night?” is a LOT easier to answer than “So wanna hang out sometime? What do you want to do?”

(via startrekrenegades)

This is really really true.

(via shabaash)

oumcartoon:

"September" by Hefnawy, from Tok Tok's 2014 calendar. 
For those who aren’t familiar with Tok Tok:

In the tumultuous three years since the Tahrir Square uprising, a number of young Egyptian cartoonists have persevered to defend a crack of space for free expression and dissent. Among their favorite slings: Tok Tok, an alt-comic magazine.
Tok Tok is more preoccupied with the country’s social issues than with the politicians of the day. Its narratives range from wordless strips on corrupt government officials and businessmen, to the misadventures of an antihero combating sexual harassment. The quarterly’s illustrations depict an Egypt largely absent in the mainstream press—downtown street corners, packed minibuses, cramped apartments, and daily addictions such as coffee or hashish. The artists challenge readers to attune themselves to the city life around them. Variously drawing on the aesthetics of Mad Magazine and Walt Disney, noir film and street art, Tok Tok captures Cairo’s grit, and is always penned in colloquial dialects. Mohammed Andeel, one of the magazine’s five co-founders, who goes only by his last name in the tradition of Egyptian cartoonists, calls Tok Tok  “an answer to censorship.”

Continue reading my profile of the comic revolutionaries in the Winter 2014 issue of the Cairo Review of Global Affairs.
Plus more posts on Tok Tok here here here here here and here.

I think someone might be mailing me an issue of Tok Tok. I wonder which issue it is…

oumcartoon:

"September" by Hefnawy, from Tok Tok's 2014 calendar

For those who aren’t familiar with Tok Tok:

In the tumultuous three years since the Tahrir Square uprising, a number of young Egyptian cartoonists have persevered to defend a crack of space for free expression and dissent. Among their favorite slings: Tok Tok, an alt-comic magazine.

Tok Tok is more preoccupied with the country’s social issues than with the politicians of the day. Its narratives range from wordless strips on corrupt government officials and businessmen, to the misadventures of an antihero combating sexual harassment. The quarterly’s illustrations depict an Egypt largely absent in the mainstream press—downtown street corners, packed minibuses, cramped apartments, and daily addictions such as coffee or hashish. The artists challenge readers to attune themselves to the city life around them. Variously drawing on the aesthetics of Mad Magazine and Walt Disney, noir film and street art, Tok Tok captures Cairo’s grit, and is always penned in colloquial dialects. Mohammed Andeel, one of the magazine’s five co-founders, who goes only by his last name in the tradition of Egyptian cartoonists, calls Tok Tok  “an answer to censorship.”

Continue reading my profile of the comic revolutionaries in the Winter 2014 issue of the Cairo Review of Global Affairs.

Plus more posts on Tok Tok here here here here here and here.

I think someone might be mailing me an issue of Tok Tok. I wonder which issue it is…

lil-reina:

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Meet Carla Morrison, Latin Grammy winning musician of Mexican descent.
Morrison is known for her sweet voice, honest lyrics, and speaking out against body and fat shamming.
Listen to her beautiful single Compartir here.
Picture courtesy of PubliMetro.

go. off.

I love love love her. Especially her songs Falta de Respeto and Eres Tu. Watch her performing live outside in the sun at the Highline Park in New York here.

lil-reina:

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Meet Carla Morrison, Latin Grammy winning musician of Mexican descent.

Morrison is known for her sweet voice, honest lyrics, and speaking out against body and fat shamming.

Listen to her beautiful single Compartir here.

Picture courtesy of PubliMetro.

go. off.

I love love love her. Especially her songs Falta de Respeto and Eres Tu. Watch her performing live outside in the sun at the Highline Park in New York here.

(via bbti-land)

uispeccoll:

uispeccoll:

itscolossal:

Secret Fore-Edge Paintings Revealed in Early 19th Century Books at the University of Iowa

Oh! Here is the version from Colossal. Almost the same!

One year ago today our fore-edge painting post and GIFs were posted to the Colossal Art and Design Blog. Our fore-edge painting post is still being forwarded around the world everyday and it is currently #12 most shared posts of all time on the Colossal.

again, again!

shabaash:

supersmashkev:

bopeep:

lawebloca:

Little Girl Plays on Gentle Giant Tibetan Mastiff ** video **

me

OMGGG

I want

I bet this dog would make a pretty good therapist, though.